• PN: B114314

COMPONENTS

45x Ab-conjugated beads (S5P11 - human Insulin Ab-bead). PN: B114314A. One vial containing 100 µL of anti-human Insulin conjugated to AimPlex Bead S5P11.

25x Biotin-detection Ab (human Insulin Biotin-dAb). PN: B114314B. One vial containing 100 µL of biotinylated anti-human Insulin.

Lyophilized Standard Mix-Human Group 4 Panel B, 10-Plex. PN: HG40010. One vial containing lyophilized recombinant human GASP-1, IFNβ, ANGPT-1, Insulin, Leptin, MIF, Resistin, Survivin, TGFα, and TPO.  Note: If multiple analyte kits on the above target list are ordered as a panel, only one vial of standard mix is supplied for those analyte kits.

STORAGE:  2-8 C in the dark.

IMPORTANT: Sodium azide forms explosive compounds with heavy metals. These products contain <0.05% (w/w) azide which with repeated contact with lead and copper commonly found in plumbing drains may result in the buildup of shock sensitive compounds. Dispose in accordance with regulations from your institute.

APPLICATION: Optimal antibody pair and antigen standard for assaying human Insulin.  Can be multiplexed with other analytes in Human Group 4.  To be used in conjunction with the AimPlex NR Basic Kit (PN: P100001) and a diluent kit. Refer to the AimPlex Multiplex Immunoassay User Manual and kit inserts for the assay procedure.

For Research Use Only.  Not for use in diagnostic procedures.

Assay Specifications:

Sample types: Cell culture supernatant, serum, plasma, bodily fluid and tissue/cell lysate

Sensitivity (LOD): < 10 pg/mL

Quantitation range:

LLOQ: < 20 pg/mL

ULOQ: > 5,000 pg/mL

Standard dose recovery: 70-130%

Intra-assay CV: < 10%

Inter-assay CV: < 20%

Cross-reactivity of analytes in Human Group 4: Negligible

Sample volume: 15 µL/test

Description:

Insulin (from the Latin, insula meaning island) is a peptide hormone produced by beta cells in the pancreas.  It regulates the metabolism of carbohydrates and fats by promoting the absorption of glucose from the blood to skeletal muscles and fat tissue and by causing fat to be stored rather than used for energy. Insulin also inhibits the production of glucose by the liver. Except in the presence of the metabolic disorder diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome, insulin is provided within the body in a constant proportion to remove excess glucose from the blood, which otherwise would be toxic. When blood glucose levels fall below a certain level, the body begins to use stored glucose as an energy source through glycogenolysis, which breaks down the glycogen stored in the liver and muscles into glucose, which can then be utilized as an energy source.

References:

1.      PDB: 1ai; Chang X, Jorgensen AM, Bardrum P, Led JJ (1997). "Solution structures of the R6 human insulin hexamer,". Biochemistry 36 (31): 9409–22. doi:10.1021/bi9631069. PMID 9235985.

2.      Wright, James R.; Yang, Hua; Hyrtsenko, Olga; Xu, Bao-You; Yu, Weiming; Pohajdak, Bill (2014). "A review of piscine islet xenotransplantation using wild-type tilapia donors and the production of transgenic tilapia expressing a "humanized" tilapia insulin". Xenotransplantation 21 (6): 485–495. doi:10.1111/xen.12115. PMC 4283710. PMID 25040337.

1.      Sonksen P, Sonksen J (2000). "Insulin: understanding its action in health and disease". Br J Anaesth 85 (1): 69–79. doi:10.1093/bja/85.1.69. PMID 10927996.